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339. Documents of the Armenian Catholic Parish of Armenopolis PDF Print E-mail

1693–2004

27.89 lma

The city of Armenopolis was founded by the Armenians in the late-17th century, on the site between the Roman castrum and the castle erected by György Martinuzzi Fráter in 1540. In 1700, Leopold I approved the purchase of the territories south of the castle of Armenopolis by the Armenians; in 1713, the Armenians who had fled from the Saxons in Bistrița also settled here. Later the Armenian families immigrating from Gheorgheni and Frumoasa would also settle here. The foundation stone was laid in 1700, shortly after the purchase. The construction of the city took nearly 15 years; its leader, Bishop Oxendio Virziresco was authorized by Leopold I himself. Armenopolis was promoted to the status of free royal city in 1786 by Emperor Joseph II.[1]

Solomon’s Church, the earliest and still existing Armenian Catholic stone church in Armenopolis, was raised between 1723 and 1724. Its name testifies to its commissioning by Salamon Simai and his wife.

Solomon’s Church proved too small, so in 1748 construction on an Armenian cathedral was begun in the southern part of the quadrangular main square. It was completed in 1759, when the first High Mass was celebrated there. The church was consecrated in honour of the Trinity by Bishop József Mártonffy on 17 June 1804.[2] A few weeks later, on 2 August, lightning struck the bell-tower, which burnt down, and so the great bell was cracked.[3]

While the documentary holdings of parishes with an average population and normal history run to some 3 to 5 linear metres of archives in the Archdiocese of Alba Iulia, the archive of the Armenian Catholic parish of Armenopolis is almost eight times as voluminous. This, of course, is in part a consequence of the fact that besides the parish’s official documentation, many non-ecclesiastic items have also been identified and organized here. The documents of the archdeaconry—due to the difficulty of separating them—have been kept in the parish’s document series; they can be researched on the basis of register-books and individual inspection.

A characteristic trait of the document batches is the intertwining of the secular community of the Armenians with the church parish. Hence we have such a wealth of valuable personal bequests, both spiritual and secular (Kristóf Szongott, Ferenc Mály, Ferenc Alexa, Lukács Bárány, Kristóf Lukácsy, etc.), which were entrusted in good faith to the Armenian Catholic parish.

The archive of the Armenian parish in Armenopolis also abounds in documents of devotion. The Armenian community gathered in various societies, typically creating associations of piety and a concomitant sense of belonging. As early as the first decades of the 18th century, they had established such societies of devotion as those dedicated to St. Gregory, St. Anne, the Virgin Mary, etc. The number of such groups also far exceeds that in conventional parishes. The social life of the Armenian community relied on such associations as the Conversational Circle or the musical Brass and Reed Band. The records, membership registers, and further documents of these societies, sister- and brotherhoods, have been neatly preserved since the turn of the last century. As regards the condition of archival materials, most of them are in good shape, though some batches have been damaged by damp air, requiring restoration or partial disinfection.

In October 2010, the documents of the Armenian Catholic parish in Armenopolis were transferred from the oratory of the grand church to the new archival storage area. In their previous location, they had been kept in the same space as the parish’s library and artworks.

339/a. Registers of births, marriages, and deaths

1714–1947

7 boxes, 1 volume = 1.26 lma

Similar to those in Elisabethopolis, the contemporary original registers of the Armenian Catholic parish of Armenopolis also escaped nationalization, so their series is intact from 1714 down to the present day.

  1. box.

a. volume. Register of baptisms, marriages, and deaths 1714–1742

b. volume. Personal index to register of baptisms 1714–1798; register of church approvals 1748–1776

  1. box.

a. volume. Register of baptisms 1742–1799

b. volume. Register of marriages 1742–1826

  1. box.

a. volume. Register of deaths 1742–1826

b. volume. Register of deaths 1826–1856

c. volume. Personal index to register of deaths 1742–1826

  1. box. Register of baptisms 1799–1825
  2. box.

a. volume. Register of baptisms and confirmations 1826–1856

b. volume. Register of marriages 1826–1857

c. volume. Register of births (drafts) 1842, 1846

  1. box.

a. volume. Register of confirmations 1804–1853

b. volume. Register of mixed marriages 1882–1909; register of conversions 1882–1947; register of apostates 1883–1902; register of confirmations 1888–1944

c. volume.

· census 1760–1783

· register of baptisms within mixed marriages 1800–1822

· Inventory of the Karácsonyi Institute 1919

· Financial inventory of Kovrig’s Girls’ Orphanage 1919[4]

· Financial inventory of the Armenian Catholic charity fund 1919

· Inventory of Simay’s Solomon Church 1919

· Inventory of Kristóf Lukácsy’s fund for church restoration 1919

· Copy of the records of parish proceedings 1784–1804

· register of mixed marriages 1803–1822

· Account of Lukács Bárány’s fund 1919

d. volume. Personal index to marriage register 1857–1913

e. volume. Census of Armenian families 1714–1741 (list created in 1943)

  1. volume. Register of baptisms 3 January to 17 August 1857
  2. box.

a. volume. Register of deaths 1845–1849 (to be disinfected and restored!)

b. volume. Personal index to register of deaths 1721–1742; personal index to register of marriages 1721–1826; book inventory 1853

c. volume. Register of mixed marriages 1865–1870

d. volume. Register of military marriages 1876–1910

e. volume. Register of Armenians affiliated with Roman Catholic or Greek Catholic parishes 1939

f. volume. Personal index to register of baptisms 1903–1960

g. volume. Personal index to register of deaths 1900–1960

339/b. Parish documents

1693–1998

57 boxes, 5 volumes = 7.38 lma

  1. box.

· chronologically ordered documents: 1693, 1708, 1710, 1715, 1719, 1721, 1725, 1727, 1729, 1731–1732, 1735–1738, 1742, 1746, 1753, 1755, 1757, 1758, 1763–1765, 1768, 1770–1774, 1776–1778, 1781–1784, 1786–1797, 1799, d. n.

· inventory of archival documents 1719–1738

  1. box. 1800–1814
  2. box. 1825–1839
  3. box. 1840–1846
  4. box. 1847–1851
  5. box. 1852–1855
  6. box. 1856–1857
  7. box. 1858–1889
  8. box. 1860
  9. box. 1861–1862
  10. box. 1863–1864
  11. box. 1865–1866
  12. box. 1867–1868
  13. box. 1869–1872
  14. box. 1873–1876
  15. box. 1877–1879
  16. box. 1880–1881
  17. box. 1882–1883
  18. box. 1884–1885
  19. box. 1886–1887
  20. box. 1888–1889
  21. box. 1890–1891
  22. box. 1892–1893
  23. box. 1894–1895
  24. box. 1896–1897
  25. box. 1898–1899
  26. box. 1900–1901
  27. box. 1902
  28. box. 1903
  29. box. 1904–1905
  30. box. 1906
  31. box. 1907
  32. box. 1908
  33. box. 1909
  34. box. 1910
  35. box. 1911
  36. box. 1912
  37. box. 1913
  38. box. 1914–1915
  39. box. 1916–1918
  40. box. 1919–1920
  41. box. 1921–1922
  42. box. 1923–1924
  43. box. 1925–1927
  44. box. 1928–1931
  45. box. 1932–1935
  46. box. 1936–1937
  47. box. 1938–1939
  48. box. 1940–1942
  49. box. 1943–1945
  50. box. 1946–1953
  51. box. 1954–1964
  52. box. 1971–1974
  53. box. 1975–1980
  54. box. 1981–1985
  55. box. 1986–1992
  56. box. 1993–1998

Register-books

1879–1966

  1. volume. Register-book 2 October 1879 (from ref. nr. 1) to 1898
  2. volume. Register-book 24 April 1898 to 18 March 1917
  3. volume. Register-book 1921–1942
  4. volume. Register-book 1936–1939
  5. volume. Register-book 1943–1966

339/c. Marriage certificates

1843–1979

1 boxes = 0.13 lma

  1. box.

a. volume. Records of free marriage parleyings 1843–1876

b. volume. Records of free marriage parleyings 1877–1888

c. volume. Records of free marriage parleyings 1902–1934

d. volume. Register of marriage discharges 1857–1893

e. volume.

· records of free marriage parleyings 1934–1940

· marriage documents 1947–1979

339/d. School documents

1857–1948

5.62 lma

339/d-I. Documents of elementary (boys’ and girls’) schools

1857–1941

8 boxes, 27 volumes = 3 lma

  1. box.
    • chronologically ordered documents of elementary school 1857–1941
    • accounts of boys’ elementary school 1902–1910
    • accounts of girls’ elementary school 1903–1910
  1. box.

· printed matter, school notebooks, drawings

· records of the sessions of the teaching staff 1879–1890

· cash-book 1885–1886

· curriculum break-down 1921–1922

  1. box. Drawing samples
  2. box. Journals of progress and absences (boys’ school) 1898–1904
  3. box. Journals of progress and absences (boys’ school) 1904–1908
  4. box.

· records of the sessions of the teaching staff (girls’ school) 1881–1902

· journals of visitation 1880–1925

· records of the sessions of the elementary teaching staff 1920–1923

  1. box.

· registers of mixed (boys’ and girls’) elementary school 1925–1940

· cash-book 1923–1940

· school registers 1925–1940

  1. box. Journals of progress and absences (girls’ school) 1898–1904
  2. volume. Journals of progress and absences (girls’ school) 1879/1880–1884/1885
  3. volume. Register of girls’ school 1885/1886–1889/1890
  4. volume. Register of girls’ school 1890/1891–1894/1895
  5. volume. Journal of enrolments (girls’ school) 1880/1881–1898/1899
  6. volume. Journal of progress 1905/1906–1906/1907
  7. volume. Register of girls’ school 1895/1896–1897/1898
  8. volume. Journal of progress and absences (girls’ school) 1907/1908–1911/1912
  9. volume. Journal of progress and absences (girls’ school) 1915/1916–1917/1918
  10. volume. Journal of progress and absences (girls’ school) 1918/1919–1920/1921
  11. volume. Journal of progress and absences (girls’ school) 1921/1922
  12. volume. Journal of progress and absences (girls’ school) 1912/1913–1914/1915
  13. volume. Register and rules of boys’ school 1890/1891–1897/1898
  14. volume. Journal of enrolments (girls’ school) 1898–1903
  15. volume. Journal of enrolments (girls’ school) 1908/1909–1913/1914
  16. volume. Journal of enrolments (girls’ school) 1914/1915–1918/1919
  17. volume. Secondary copies of elementary school grading register 1925/1926–1938/1939
  18. volume. Journal of enrolments (boys’ school) 1898/1899–1903/1904
  19. volume. Journal of progress and absences (boys’ school) 1908/1909–1909/1910
  20. volume. Journal of progress and absences (boys’ school) 1910/1911–1911/1912
  21. volume. Journal of progress and absences (boys’ school) 1918/1919–1921/1922
  22. volume. Secondary copies of elementary school grading registers (boys’ and girls’ schools) 1887/1888, 1903/1904, 1904/1905
  23. volume. Journal of progress and absences (boys’ school) 1879/1880–1884/1885
  24. volume. Journal of progress and absences (boys’ school) 1875/1876–1878/1879
  25. volume. Journal of enrolments (boys’ school) 1904/1905–1918/1919
  26. volume. Registers of mixed elementary people’s school 1922/1923–1924/1925
  27. volume. Journal of progress and absences (boys’ school) 1915/1916–1917/1918
  28. volume. Journal of progress and absences (boys’ school) 1912/1913–1914/1915

339/d-II. Documents of higher elementary school

1875–1925

3 boxes, 1 volume = 0.42 lma

  1. box.

· chronologically ordered documents 1875–1945

· enrolment registers for children, first half of the 20th century

  1. box.
    • records of the sessions of the teaching staff 1891–1923
    • school reports 1878–1902, 1921–1923
    • enrolment journals 1919–1925
    • register-book (administrative journal) 1920–1921
  1. box. Miscellaneous teaching supplements and prints, late-19th and early-20th century
  2. volume. Journal of enrolments 1919–1925

339/d-III. Documents of the vocational school

1874–1916

2 boxes = 0.26 lma

  1. box. Chronologically ordered documents 1895, 1910–1915
  2. box.
    • committee records of the vocational school 1895–1916
    • records of the sessions of the teaching staff 1883–1902
    • chronologically ordered documents 1874–1909

339/d-IV. Documents of the Armenian Catholic orphanage of St. Gregory the Illuminator

1860–1948

15 boxes = 1.94 lma

The boys’ orphanage in Armenopolis was founded by Armenian Catholic parson Kristóf Lukácsy. Its inception began with Kristóf Lukácsy’s personal donation of 4,000 forints in 1860, when 4 orphans were accommodated here. Further contributions to the foundation were made by János Ákoncz, Simon Moldován, Emánuel Csomák, and Márton Kapatán. Until the parson’s death, the boys admitted to the orphanage were housed with Armenian families; only after his death in 1876 did the relocation of the institute into a new building commence; the new school-year of 1877 saw its inauguration. In 1893, the boys’ orphanage inherited another 35,000 forints from grammar-school teacher Gergely Czetz’s estate, which was sufficient to fund the construction of a new building according to the architectural plans of Lorenzo Zotti; capacity thus grew to 18 children.[5] The earthly remains of the benefactor, Gergely Czetz, were translated to the chapel of the new institute; the new orphanage was consecrated by Parson and Directors Lukács Bárány.[6]

  1. box. Minutes 1860–1877
  2. box.
    • book of incomes and expenses 1911–1934
    • cash-book 1926–1938
    • book of domestic expenses 1930–1940
  1. box. Documents of the orphanage 1860–1879
  2. box. Documents of the orphanage 1880–1889
  3. box. Documents of the orphanage 1890–1899
  4. box. Documents of the orphanage 1900–1909
  5. box. Documents of the orphanage 1910–1919
  6. box. Documents of the orphanage 1920–1948
  7. box. Economic documents of the orphanage 1863–1923
  8. box. Inventories 1905–1917
  9. box. Receipts 1904–1909
  10. box. Receipts 1912–1917, 1919–1923
  11. box.

· chronologically ordered documents 1883–1948

· plans and designs second half of the 20th century

· receipts 1903–1920

· cash-books 1936–1948

· register of pupils 1903–1947

  1. box.

· register of births, marriages, and deaths 1873–1942

· constitution 1912

  1. box.

· documents of attorney Miklós Voith, executioner of Kristóf Lukácsy’s estate 1879–1891 (proceedings of the regale of Iacobeni [Mezőszentjakab])

· budget for the construction of the girls’ orphanage 1900–1930

· documents of the boys’ orphanage 1903–1926

· proceedings and plans for the construction of the boys’ orphanage 1892–1893

· the exchange transactions of the seat of the boys’ orphanage 1944–1948

339/e. Economic documents

1729–2004

34 boxes = 4.2 lma

  1. box.

a. volume. Ledger of church taxes 1729–1780

b. volume. Ledger of church taxes 1729–1778

c. volume. Ledger of church taxes 1729–1761

d. volume. Ledger of church taxes 1769–1774

e. volume. Alphabetical index to ledger of church taxes 18th century

f. volume. Alphabetical index to ledger of church taxes 18th century

  1. box.

· account-book 1787–1796

· records of brewery 1797; records of mill 1802

· accounts 1826–1845, 1830–1845, 1863–1866, 1879–1944, 1890–1933

  1. box.

a. volume. Account-book (church) 1864–1888

b. volume. Account-book (charity fund) 1844–1879

  1. box. Cash-books 1876–1884, 1891–1894, 1910–1912, 1920–1936
  2. box. Cash-books 1941–1949, 1966–1977 box.
  3. box.

· statements of sources and applications 1908, 1924, 1949

· dwelling register of apartment houses 1939

· documents concerning apartment houses 1947–1954

· mail-registers 1879–1894, 1921–1951

· tax documents 1941–1944

· documents concerning the dotation of employees 1929–1948

  1. box.

· documents concerning the renovation of the main church 1925–1932, 1946, 1960–1964

· sketch of the vitralium and related documents 1908

  1. box.

· inventories 18th century, 1779, 1856, 1876–1877, 1880, 1907, inventory of the cathedral 1946

· inventory 1933–1934

· inventories and related decrees 1945–1952

· inventories of Solomon’s Church 1898, 1904

  1. box. Economic documents (1796)–1956
  2. box.
    • accounts, budgets 1849–1949
    • cash-book of St. Gregory the Illuminator’s mass-foundation 1852–1920
    • documents concerning the repair of church buildings (grand church, chapel, status house, Solomon’s Church) 1867–1914
    • documents concerning the devotional foundations 1870–1891
    • register of persons with loans 1873–1897
  1. box.

· general insurance documents 1880–1905

· shares 1880–1944

· documents concerning the nursery institute 1881–1900

· registers of church tax 1890–1944

· register of salaries 1896

· documents concerning the building of the cantor’s and sexton’s dwelling 1896–1898

· tax payment sheets 1898–1921

  1. box.

· records of the economic committee 1934–1935

· cashbook of the fund for Solomon’s Church 1936–1941

· purchase of property (Temesváry and Tódorfi Houses) 1939–1941

· financial orders 1949–1952

· deeds of mass foundations 1913–1948

· tax proceedings 1933–1956

  1. box. Book inventories first half of the 19th century, first half of the 20th century, mid-20th century, 1948
  2. box. Documents concerning rented buildings 1909–2004
  3. box.

· inventories 1944–1973

· Book inventories 1938, 1962

  1. box. Inventories 1944–1973
  2. box. Documents concerning the renovation of the Armenian Catholic cathedral 1960–1985
  3. box. Economic documents (gas, heating) 1950–1999
  4. box. Ransom for cemetery lots 1955–1983
  5. box.

· documents concerning the repair and reconstruction of the church organ 1892–1962

· documents concerning the repairs of the church 1996

  1. box. Documents concerning property 1925–1973
  2. box. Accounts concerning the records, inventories of property 1946
  3. box. Receipts, invoices 1849–1951
  4. box. Receipts, invoices 1907–1931
  5. box. Receipts, invoices 1932–1938
  6. box. Receipts, invoices 1938–1948
  7. box. Financial certificates 1903–1939
  8. box. Receipts of Solomon’s Church 1879–1918
  9. box. Receipts 1948–1950
  10. box. Financial certificates 1943–1945
  11. box. Cash-book documents (receipts, invoices) 1940–1941
  12. box. Cash-book documents (receipts, invoices) 1942–1946
  13. box. Cash-book documents (receipts, invoices) 1949
  14. box. Cash-book documents (receipts, invoices) 1951–1961

339/f. Documents of social and devotional societies and institutions

1700–1949

12 boxes = 1.54 lma

Several document series have been rendered under this heading: documents of the Tanners’ Guild, records of various associations of piety, matters of the Spital, the documentation of the Conversational Circle, the Benevolent Ladies’ Union, the Circle for Armenopolis, and the Catholic Men’s Union, as well as the records and correspondence of the Brass and Reed Band. Apart from the documentary stock relating to the Ladies’ Union, the Rosary Society, the Men’s Union, and the Altar Society, most holdings are quite new in contrast to those of other parishes. One of the most remarkable is the Karácsonyi Institute.

The Karácsonyi Spital, or the House for the Poor, was founded by Emánuel Karácsonyi in 1803, in order to support the aged and the invalid. The founding capital was 20,000 forints.[7] The Conversational Circle operated in the building of the Casino, and its regular meetings were recorded in precise minutes. The organized activity of the Brass and Reed Band, and the concerts they held around the turn of the century, demonstrate the musical talent of the Armenian Catholic community.

The presence of the numerous societies of devotion in Armenian parishes is discussed in much detail in the historical introduction to this volume.

  1. box. Volumes of the Tanners’ Guild:

a. volume. Constitution of the Tanners’ Guild 1700 (to be restored!)[8]

b. volume. Cash-book of the Tanners’ Guild 1736–1874

c. volume. Minutes of the meetings of the Tanners’ Guild 1936–1946

  1. box.

a. volume. Deed of foundation and membership register of the Jesus Society 17 September 1729 to 10 May 1753

b. volume. List of the deceased members of the Jesus Society mid-18th century

c. volume. Membership register of the Jesus Society 1797–1855

d. volume. Account-book of the Jesus Society 1825–1849

e. volume. Records of the Society of the Holy Virgin 1729–1840

f. volume. Account-book of the Society of the Holy Virgin 1729–1772

g. volume. List of the deceased members of the Society of St. Gregory the Illuminator 1729

  1. box.

a. volume. Register of masses with intentions 1790–1802

b. volume. Membership register of the Trinity Society 1729–1786; account-book 1853–1878

  1. box.

a. volume. Records of the Rosary Society 5 May 1929 to 13 October 1935

b. volume. Records of the Society of St. Anne 24 April 1929 to 18 July 1937

c. volume. Roll of the Society of St. Anne 1935–1951

d. volume. Cash-book of the Society of St. Anne 1942–1947

e. volume. Cash-book of the choir 1939–1944

f. volume. Cashbook of Moldován and Csáusz’s Foundation 1942–1947

  1. box.

a. volume. Membership register of devotional societies 1898–1913

b. volume. Roll and records of the Altar Society 1 April 1929 to 8 September 1946

c. volume. Cash-book of the Altar Society 1929–1934

d. volume. Cash-book of the Altar Society 1935–1940

e. volume. Guest-book of the Armenian Catholic main church 1877–1974

f. volume. Mixed volume of parish priest Ferenc Alexa (economic matters, inventories, census) 1934–1944

  1. box.

a. volume. Records of the Circle for Armenopolis 20 December 1891 to 11 January 1897

b. volume. Membership register of the Circle for Armenopolis 1892–1895

c. volume. Records for the Catholic Men’s Union 1929–1936

d. volume. Cash-book of the Catholic Men’s Union 1929–1937

e. volume. Documents of the Catholic Men’s Union 1929–1934

  1. box. Documents of Karácsonyi’s House for the Poor

· thematically ordered documents 1903–1920

· accounts 1898–1906

· receipts 1915–1920

· cash-books 1915–1920

· cash-book 1936–1947

· inventory 1949

  1. box. Documents of the Conversational Circle:

· Records of the Conversational Circle (Association) 1880–1899

· Documents of the Conversational Circle 1906–1917

  1. box. Documents of the Conversational Circle:

· Constitution of the Conversational Circle 1860

· Membership register of the Conversational Circle 1862–1895

· Records of the Conversational Circle 1864–1879

  1. box. Documents of the Conversational Circle 1891–1907
  2. box. Documents of the Charitable Ladies’ Union:

· thematically ordered documents 1909–1944

· register of founding members 1928–1943

  1. box. Documents of the Brass and Reed Band:

· Records of the Brass and Reed Band 12 February 1898 to 9 October 1913

· Documents of the Brass and Reed Band 1908–1909

339/g. Thematically arranged volumes

1737–1991

6 boxes = 0.77 lma

  1. box.

a. volume. Census of the Armenopolis manor 1737

b. volume. Survey of the estates of Fizeșu Gherlii (Ördöngösfüzes) and Sânmartin (Szépkenyerűszentmárton) 1779

  1. box. Volumes concerning charitable trusts:

a. volume. Register of charitable trusts 1751–1791

b. volume. Alphabetical index to charitable trusts 1751–1856

c. volume. Register of charitable trusts 1759–1882

d. volume. Cash-book of charitable trusts 1880–1920, 1936–1947

e. volume. Roll of charitable trusts (1804) 1881–1921

f. volume. Register of charitable trusts 1751–1783

  1. box.

a. volume. Visitatio canonica 1731; protocol of episcopal decrees 1753–1781

b. volume. Protocol of episcopal decrees 1793–1813

c. volume. Protocol of episcopal decrees 1813–1820

  1. box.

a. volume. Account-book 1783–1814; protocol of episcopal decrees 1820–1825

b. volume. Protocol of episcopal decrees 1825–1841

c. volume. Protocol of episcopal decrees 1841–1848

  1. box.

a. volume. Protocol of episcopal decrees 1851–1857

b. volume. Protocol of episcopal decrees 1858–1874

c. volume. Protocol of episcopal decrees 1883–1909

  1. box.

· volume. Records of the meetings of the church council 1944–1949, 1967–1991

· volume. Book of announcements 1957–1966

· volume. Register of ransoms for cemetery lots 1910–1957

339/h. Thematically arranged documents

1826–1990

15 boxes = 1.95 lma

  1. box. Armenian-language calendars 19th–20th century
  2. box. Armenian-language sermons 19th–20th century
  3. box. Armenian-language prayers, songs, Stations of the Cross 19th century
  4. box. Invitations, posters 1891–1943
  5. box. Armenian-language manuscripts, prints 19th–20th century
  6. box. Latin and Hungarian-language prints 19th–20th century
  7. box.

· Documents concerning the body of representatives of the free royal city of Armenopolis 1849–1942

· census of the electors of the Catholic Congress of Autonomy 1897

· Documents concerning the Armenian Association of Romania 1925–1928

· Documents concerning status 1897–1917

· census 1882

· wills and testaments 1873–1944

  1. box. Miscellaneous manuscripts, notes, poems late-19th to early-20th century
  2. box.

· documents concerning the proprietary rights of the parish (documents of lawsuits) 1830–1906

· documents and cashbook of the charity fund of Armenopolis 1885–1889

  1. box.

· minutes of a witness hearing (legal proceedings) 1841

· documents concerning the holiday of St. Gregory 1923–1946

· assembly invitations 1925–1947, 1973–1985

· documents concerning historic buildings 1944–1963

· death certificates 1964–1983

· registry documentation 1967–1971

· conversation deficits, documents concerning damages 1934–1990

  1. box.

· documents concerning the tomb of Adeodát Govrik 1912–1914

· documents concerning Solomon’s Church 1826–1877

· list of food and medication distributed among the poor 1832–1845, 1851

· constitution of the body of representatives of the Armenian Catholic parish 1878

· documents concerning pilgrimages and journeys 1893–1910

· documents concerning the production of Bishop Oxendio Virziresco’s statue 1894–1910

· documents concerning the renovation of Solomon’s Church 1900–1903

· disciplinary issues of priests 1902–1908

  1. box. Notes, family trees, correspondences concerning the Armenian family tree research in Armenopolis first half to mid-20th century
  2. box. Minor prints 19th–20th century
  3. box. Minor prints 19th–20th century
  4. box.

· Armenian-language document batch 18th–20th century

· mixed personal bequests to be broken down 19th–20th century

339/i. Personal bequests

1702–1973

19 boxes, 1 folder = 2.41 lma

The holdings of personal bequests consist of 32 stocks batches altogether, in which one can find the personal and official correspondence as well as private documents of both the spiritual and the secular leaders of the Armenians in Armenopolis, especially regarding their scientific elite. This collection, in its structure, extent, and complexity, is unique among the heretofore classified archives of the Archdiocese of Alba Iulia. In contrast to previous practices, individual personal bequests have been marked with Roman numerals due to the enormous bulk of the holdings; thus they constitute the series in Stock “i” of group nr. 339.

The personal documentation ensembles to be described below were found in utter disorder and chaos in the oratory of the Armenian main church, kept in coffers, boxes, baskets, and chests. Due to the chaotic layout, the documents pertaining to individual persons had to be identified one by one, leaf by leaf, which required greater input and more laborious effort from a number of collaborators. After the stocks had been separated according to the persons involved, it became clear that the extensive bequests of a number of people are assembled here.

While introducing the personal bequests, we must also mention the sad fact that the postcards once bearing stamps were mutilated by unidentified “delinquents,” partly cutting, partly tearing off their respective corner, which has led to several texts becoming fragmentary.

The catalogues of the documents belonging to notable persons and personages begin with a more detailed introduction, but we are also publishing the bequests of a number of such persons whose lives and activities are not recorded in newspapers or other publications. The bequests or fragments of the latter are here given as simple listings.

339/i-I. Kristóf Szongott (1843–1907)

1863–1907

4 boxes = 0.49 lma

Kristóf Szongott was born in Bogata (Marosbogát) on 21 March 1843 and died in Armenopolis on 24 January 1907. He was a teacher, as well as creating a considerable written and translated oeuvre in history and literature. He is regarded as the greatest scholar of the Armenians in Hungary and Transylvania. He studied in Armenopolis and Alba Iulia. Between 1884 and 1904, he was the director of the Armenian Catholic grammar school in Armenopolis. In 1887, he founded the periodical Armenia, which he edited, published, and partly also contributed to up until his death in 1907. In 1905, he established the Armenian Museum in Armenopolis and acted as its first director. His comprehensive work as a researcher and editor spanned the origin, history, culture, and ethnography of the Armenians in Hungary. His participation in tutoring, church administration, local history, and public affairs was equally fruitful. As a grammar school teacher, he taught religion, mathematics, calligraphy, geometry, Hungarian and German, history, and physical geography. He was a member of the assembly of the Catholic Status of Transylvania and elected honorary member of St. Stephen’s Association as well as Reader at the Armenian Department of the Anthropological Society of Hungary. His life-long objective was to explore the history of the Armenian nation and to publish his findings in Hungarian. The monthly periodical Armenia, which he founded, also served this purpose.[9]

His main works comprise Moses of Chorene, or The History of Great Armenia (translated from Armenian to Hungarian, Armenopolis, 1892); Armenopolis, the Hungaro-Armenian Metropolis in Words and Pictures (Armenopolis, 1893); The Monograph of the Free Royal City of Armenopolis 1700–1900 (Armenopolis, 1901, 1903); Genealogy of the Armenian Families in Hungary (Armenopolis, 1898); Ethnography of the Armenians in Hungary (Armenopolis, 1903).

Due to his rich publication history and his eminent role in the Armenian Catholic parish and the local Armenian community, it is most just that his official and private correspondence should be entrusted to the parish of Armenopolis. Within the stock of personal bequests, Kristóf Szongott’s documents constitute one of the bulkiest volumes. To order them was only possible via one-by-one separation, due to their having been merged with other personal bequests.

  1. box. Private correspondence 1863–1907
  2. box. Correspondence concerning the Armenia periodical and the Armenian Museum Union 1880–1907
  3. box. Notes concerning historical and ethnographical researches, as well as teaching activities 1872–1907
  4. box.
    • economic documents 1870–1907
    • official correspondence 1869–1907
    • letters from Gergely Govrik 1891–1906
    • documents concerning his death 1907

339/i-II. Dr. István Mály (1830–1916)

1853–1916

5 boxes = 0.62 lma

Dr. István Mály was born in Armenopolis on 21 October 1830. At the age of four, his family moved to Fizeșu Gherlii, where he spent his childhood. He attended grammar school at the Piarists in Bistrița and in Cluj, before graduating in medicine in Pest and Vienna. He qualified as a doctor of medicine at the university of Pest in 1856. He moved to Cluj and became a renowned physician there, publishing numerous articles on cholera, whose stages, treatments, and prevention he researched from 1873 onwards. He was a representative at the Roman Catholic Status of Transylvania and the chair of the assembly of the Independence Party in Cluj.[10]

1. box.

· university grade-books 1853–1854

· doctoral diploma 10 February 1856

· medals 1877, 1910

· official documents 1884–1917

· documents concerning his death 1916

2. box.

· private correspondence, picture postcards 1870–1916

· calling cards

3. box. Private correspondence 1870–1916

4. box. Economic documents 1865–1916

5. box.

· memorial album for the 50th anniversary of Dr. István Mály’s medical practice 1906–1909

· memorial album for Dr. István Mály’s 80th birthday 1910

· memorial album for the 60th anniversary of Dr. István Mály’s medical practice 1916

339/i-III. Lukács Bárány (1841–1920)

1880–1917

2 boxes = 0.25 lma

Lukács Bárány was born in Armenopolis on 29 June 1841. He attended grammar school in Cluj and studied theology in Vienna, where he was ordained priest in 1864. From 1862, he taught at the grammar school of Armenopolis. Between 1879 and 1920, he was the parson of Armenopolis; from 1895, also archdeacon. He died on 6 May 1920.[11]

1. box. Documents received from the administrative committee of Szolnok–Doboka County as a committee member 1880–1915

2. box.

· documents concerning the Armenian bishopric and science organization 1883–1914

· semi-official and unfiled documents 1894–1917

· invitations, greetings 1907–1917

· the inscribed photograph of Lajos Kossuth 1883

· Hungaro-Armenians 1916 (manuscript)

339/i-IV. Kristóf Lukácsi (Lukácsy) (1804–1876)

1823–1889

1 box = 0.13 lma

Kristóf Lukácsy (b. Beclean [Bethlen], Szolnok–Doboka County, 30 March 1804; d. Armenopolis, 24 October 1876) was a Catholic priest, author of ecclesiastic and historical works, and Armenologist. He attended grammar school and studied humanities in Armenopolis and Alba Iulia, while he graduated in theology from the university in Vienna. On 20 December 1827, he was ordained Armenian Catholic priest in Vienna, after which he moved to Armenopolis, where he acted as curate until 1837. Between 1837 and 1853, he taught at the seminary in Alba Iulia; from 1853 to 1855, he was director there. Between 1855 and 1876, he acted as Armenian Catholic parish priest and archdeacon in Armenopolis. His fortune of 40,000 forints was donated to the Armenian Catholic boys’ orphanage he had founded in honour of St. Gregory the Illuminator. He rests in the crypt of the cathedral of Armenopolis. As an advocate of Armenian-Hungarian language relations, he was highly esteemed by the Hungarian Academy of Science for his treatise on The Arch-Ancestors, Erstwhile Names, and Dwelling-Places of the Hungarians (Cluj, 1870; reprinted Budapest, 2000). His other works include Historia Armenorum Transsylvaniae, a Latin-language sourcebook (Vienna, 1859); Addenda to the History of the Armenians in Transylvania (in manuscript); Life of St. Gregory the Illuminator (in manuscript); Armenian–Hungarian–Latin Dictionary (in manuscript).[12]

  1. box.
    • official documents concerning his activities in Alba Iulia 1823–1856
    • documents concerning his estate, economic reports (manor of Copftelek[13]) 1876–1889

339/i-V. Kristóf Gajzágó (1767–1855)

1786–1836

1 box = 0.12 lma

Kristóf Gajzágó was born in Armenopolis in 1767. In 1802, he was ordained priest, and he became an institutor with the family of Count Haller in Sânpaul (Kerelőszentpál). From 1830, he was a chaplain in Armenopolis, before being appointed parson and archdeacon in 1839. From 1847, he was a school supervisor. He died on 24 August 1855.[14]

1. box. Theological notes, sermon fragments 1786–1836

339/i-VI. Gergely Czetz (1823–1889)

1851–1886

1 box = 0.13 lma

Gergely Czetz taught at the grammar school in Armenopolis and he was a co-founder of the Armenian Catholic boys’ orphanage. Born in Dej in 1822, he attended grammar school and studied law in Cluj. From 1847, he taught at the Armenian Catholic elementary school of Armenopolis. From 1861, he was a teacher at the Armenian Catholic grammar school there. In 1889, he donated two buildings and 43,000 forints in cash for the expansion of St. Gregory the Illuminator’s boys’ orphanage in Armenopolis, the city where he died on 24 August 1889.[15]

1. box. Manuscripts, correspondence 1851–1886

339/i-VII. István Bárány (1795–1846)

1818–1828

1 box = 0.13 lma

István Bárány was a priest in Armenopolis from 1812. He died there on 28 May 1846, at the age of 51.[16]

1. box. Two appointments and a telegram 1818–1828

339/i-VIII. Gyula Merza (1878–1943)

1878–1943

1 box = 0.13 lma

Gyula Merza (b. Cluj, 25 February 1861; d. Cluj, 15 December 1843) was a Hungarian ethnographer and Armenologist, as well as an author of tourist travelogues. He was known under many pseudonyms: Araráti, Ekefalvi, Figyelő, Sinapsis, Vándor, Veridicus, Za-la. He attended the grammar school in his native Cluj before studying medicine in Cluj and Vienna. He pursued an economic career and turned himself into an expert on tourism by criss-crossing Europe and studying tourist destinations, holiday resorts, tourist institutions, and museums of local history and ethnography. As a notary and treasurer-general of the Carpathian Union of Transylvania and a founding member of the Hungarian Union for General Education in Transylvania, he also played an instrumental role in establishing the Armenian Museum in Armenopolis. He edited the Erdély journal of local research (1903–1908) and collaborated on the special journal Ararat, published in Bucharest (1924–1925). After 1919, his articles on ethnography and tourism appeared in Keleti Újság, Magyar Nép, Pásztortűz, Véndiákok Lapja, Nagyvárad, and Független Újság. Coming from an Armenian family, he relentlessly promoted the exploration of the past and the customs of the Armenians in Transylvania. In his treatise on The Causes and Remedies of the Ethnographic Decline of Domestic Armenians (Armenopolis, 1895), he discussed the destiny of Hungaro-Armenians, while The Armenian Cross (Armenopolis, 1902) gained him the Apostolic Blessing of Pope Leo XIII. He commemorated Kristóf Szongott, the founder of Armenia (1907); his work On the Armenian Popular Poets (Armenopolis, 1907) is a sourcebook for literary history. He also compiled the bibliography of the Armenians in Transylvania (in manuscript) and submitted a national and contemporary profile of the Armenians in Transylvania to the Transylvanian Hungarian Yearbook of 1932. His major works on tourism comprise A Journey’s Memories from the Land of Lakes (1895), Swiss Pictures (1896), A Visit to Foreign Alpine Clubs (1897), History of the Carpathian Union of Transylvania (separate print from the Erdély periodical, 1930/4–5), and The Emergence of Hungarian Tourism in Transylvania (chapter from A Thousand Years of Hungarian Sport, Budapest, 1930).[17]

1. box.

· correspondence 1878–1920

· obituary 1943

339/i-IX. Mrs. Joachim Dobos, née Mária Donogán (1878–1943)

1912–1942

1 box = 0.12 lma

Mária Donogán was President of the Charitable Ladies’ Society in Armenopolis.

  1. box. Correspondence 1912–1942

339/i-X. Károly Csipkés

1702–1885

1 box = 0.13 lma

  1. box. Diplomas, school reports 1702–1885

339/i–XI–XVI. János Jakabfi, Róza Bocsánczi, Gyula Simon, Joachim Dobos, Ferenc Délczeg, Ferenc Alexa

1878–1943

1 folder = 0.13 lma

  1. folder.

XI. János Jakabfi (1779–1791)

János Jakabfi was born in Siculeni (Madéfalva). He studied with the Jesuits in Șumuleu Ciuc (1743) and Cluj (1747–1748).[18] From 1779, he was the parson of Armenopolis, until his death on 3 September 1791.[19]

· doctoral diploma 21 June 1751

· other appointments 1751, 1757, 1764

XII. Róza Bocsánczi

· diploma 1878

XIII. Gyula Simon

· medal decoration 1885

XIV. Joachim Dobos (1847–1912)

· memorial certificate 1893

XV. Ferenc Délczeg

· final dimissory letter 1912

XVI. Ferenc Alexa

Ferenc Alexa was born in Armenopolis on 27 October 1890. He was ordained in Vienna in 1914. Subsequent to his service in Elisabethopolis (1917–1935), he was the parish priest of Armenopolis up until his death. He promoted the Armenian language among his flock. His works include Armenian High Mass (Cluj, 1919) and 1000-word Hungarian–Armenian Dictionary (Elisabethopolis, 1922).[20]

· appointments, official correspondence 1929–1957


339/i–XVII–XXXIII. László Veres, Zakariás Patrubán, Márton Kapatán, Dr. László Esztegár, Dr. Antal Molnár, Regina Haraga, Mihály Turcsa, Malvin Gogomán, Gusztáv Papp, Márton Mártonffi, the Délczeg Family (Ferenc, Ilona, and Mária), Grigore Covaciu, Dr. András Lengyel, Bertalan Sáhin, Mária Kovács, Ferenc Alexa

1835–1973

1 box = 0.13 lma

  1. box.

XVII. László Veres

· lyceum school report 10 July 1835

XVIII. Zakariás Patrubán

· patent of commerce 1847

XIX. Márton Kapatán (1813–1891)

Márton Kapatán was born on 11 November 1813 in Armenopolis. He attended grammar school in his native city and in Cluj, before studying philosophy and law in Oradea. He commenced his studies in theology at the Diocese of Csanád before moving to Alba Iulia, where he was ordained in 1839. He worked as a priest, and sometimes also as a teacher, in Poian (Kézdiszentkereszt, Kézdipolyán), Târgu Mureș, Șimleu Silvaniei (Szilágysomlyó), Zlatna (Zalatna), Câmpeni (Topánfalva; also attending to Abrud [Abrudbánya] and Baia de Arieș [Aranyosbánya]), Sfântu Gheorghe, and Roșia Montană (Verespatak). During his two years in the latter, he was also the district archdeacon. After a return to Zlatna, he was appointed canon in Alba Iulia; later he was promoted to rector of the seminary by Bishop Fogarassy, which he directed from 1875 to 1883. Due to health complications, he requested permission to return home to Armenopolis, where he was serving as priest when he died on 8 March 1891. He was buried in the Armenian Head Church in Armenopolis.[21]

· documents from his office in Roșia Montană 1870–1871

· one letter 1910

XX. Dr. László Esztegár (1870–1908)

László Esztegár lawyer, director of the Savings Bank Inc., representative of Szolnok–Doboka County and the city of Armenopolis. He published several articles in Armenia.

· school report and personal documents 1870–1904

XXI. Dr. Antal Molnár (1847–1902)

Dr. Antal Molnár was a Member of Parliament. He published several articles in the Armenia periodical about the Armenian language, law, and other historical matters concerning the Armenians. Kristóf Szongott paid due respect to him in the 3rd issue of the 1898 volume of Armenia, highlighting his political achievements in promoting the interests of Transylvanian Armenians.[22]

· official documents 1877–1906

XXII. Regina Haraga (1883–1935)

· official and private documents 1883–1935

XXIII. Mihály Turcsa

Mihály Turcsa was curate in Armenopolis.

· appointments, commissions 1886–1926

XXIV. Malvin Gogomán (1887–1956)

Malvin Gogomán was a teacher in Armenopolis.

· Certificates, school reports 1897–1956

XXV. Dr. Ágoston (Gusztáv) Papp (1878–1938)

Dr. Ágoston Papp was a city councillor.

· degree of law 26 June 1903 (in a separate holder)

· two letters 1910

XXVI. Márton Mártonffi (1848–1917)

Márton Mártonffi was a Member of Parliament, national director-general of technical education and knight of the Order of Leopold. He was born in Reciu (Szilágyrécse) on 15 March 1848. He attended grammar school in Armenopolis and Cluj. After interrupting his priestly career, he studied in Pest and went on to teach and supervise at schools in Kosice (Kassa) and in Timiş (Temes) County. He published a number of literary, political, and pedagogical articles in various specialist periodicals, while also editing an excellent grammar-book of Hungarian. In 1893, he was on the nationwide supervisory board of industrial and commercial professional schools. In 1894 he was appointed royal councillor, and in 1896 he was elected the national director-general of technical education.[23]

· manuscripts, correspondence concerning the Armenian community 1912–1915

XXVII. Ferenc, Ilona, and Mária Délczeg

· family documents, correspondence 1912–1942

XXVIII. Grigore Covaciu (1886–)

· personal and legal documents 1915–1930

XXIX. Dr. András Lengyel

· doctoral diploma 1930

XXX. Bertalan Sáhin (1903–1974)

Bertalan Sáhin was born in Armenopolis on 28 April 1903. He studied theology in Vienna, where he was ordained by Mechitarist Archabbot and Archbishop Gergely Govrik in 1928. In 1971, he was appointed papal prelate. He died in Gheorgheni on 5 May 1974; he was buried in the Armenian Catholic cemetery there.[24]

· official documents 1953–1973

XXXI. Mária Kovács

· personal documents 1957–1970

XXXII. Ferenc Alexa

Ferenc Alexa was a teacher.

· personal documents 1869–1899

Unidentified personal bequests late-19th to early-20th century.

339/j. Photographic archive

19th century–20th century

4 boxes, 1 folder = 0.65 lma

  1. box.
    • photographs of priests
    • photographs of buildings and of nature
  1. box. Family photographs
  2. box. Photos of lay persons (451 items)
  3. box. Mixed photographs
  4. folder. Mixed photographs

339/k. Obituaries

1851–1962

11 boxes = 1.32 lma

The collection of obituaries in the collective archive is also unique in the history of parish archives. It constitutes a valuable personal database of the obituary notices of clerical and lay persons, which yield invaluable information for family tree research. The collection has been alphabetized, and we have kept this order. In the near future, the entire alphabetical list is to be made available as a digital database on the archival homepage of the archdiocese.

  1. box.
    • A: 1871–1949
    • B: 1868–1955
  1. box.

· C: 1867–1942

· D: 1869–1941

  1. box.

· E: 1870–1967

· F: 1865–1955

  1. box.

· G: 1851–1949

· H: 1878–1941

  1. box.

· I: 1862–1942

· J: 1863–1948

· K: 1871–1942

  1. box.

· L: 1873–1940

· M: 1864–1947

  1. box.

· N: 1872–1943

· O: 1884–1942

· Ny: 1886–1912

  1. box. P: 1878–1931
  2. box.

· R: 1882–1947

· S: 1885–1922

· Sz: 1872–1914

  1. box.

· T: 1863–1948

· U: 1889–1929

· V: 1868–1935

  1. box.

· W: 1876–1911

· Z: 1885–1920

· A–Z: 1882–1904

· German-language obituary notices 1904–1917

· Romanian-language obituary notices 1871–1916

· obituaries of priests 1888–1962

339/l. Archive of engravings[25]

18th–20th century

1 folder = 0.2 lma

  1. Depiction of the votary altar of the Blessed Virgin of the Scapulary in Radna (Máriaradna), c. 1700, n.s., 44.3×33 cm
  2. Immaculate Conception (Immaculata Conceptio), mid-18th century, n.s., Armenian inscription, 42×24.5 cm
  3. Bishop St. James of Nisibi, mid-18th century, n.s., Armenian inscription, 41.5×29 cm
  4. Allegory of the Ruination of the Land of Armenia, late-19th century, n.s., 42×29.5 cm
  5. Vehaphar T. T. Mekertics, Catholicus of the Armenians in the Crimean, 19th century, n.s., 66×48 cm (2 items)
  6. Archabbot and Archbishop Azária Aristáges of Caesarea in the Mechitarist monastery in Vienna, 19th century, s.b.l.: “Carved in stone by Sándor Lukáts,” s.b.r.: “Antal Hartinger, Vienna,” 36×25 cm– 2 items, 42.5×32 cm – 1 item (3 items total)
  7. Blessed Martyr Gomidasz (Komitas), Armenian priest, musical composer, early-20th century, s.b.l.: “Proprieta Riservata,” s.b.r.: “Tip. S. Lega Eucaristica Milano,” 35×25 cm– 2 items, 30×22 cm– 1 item (3 items total)
  8. Hajk, late-19th century, Armenian and Russian inscription, 65×44 cm
  9. Portraits of five Armenian poets (Nazarean, Abovean, Alisan, R. Patkanean, Raffi) with Armenian inscriptions, late-19th century, n.s., 41×43 cm
  10. Abbot Mechitar of Sebaste, 19th century, s. in Armenian: “Lsznkoc H. V. Melk,” 31×22 cm
  11. King Artaxias of Armenia, 1896, Armenian and Russian inscription, 50×41 cm
  12. The Martyrdom of thirty-two virgins in 1794, second half of the 19th century, s.b.r.: “M. Bartalot pinxit,” 32×27 cm
  13. Guardian Angels and Patron Saints, 19th century, n.s., 18×11 cm
  14. The Lamentable Passion of Jesus Christ, 1866, s.b.: “Pest, 1866. Printed and published by Alajos Bucsánszky. (Nr. 20 Ősz Street),” 44×36 cm
  15. The Apostles carry the Virgin Mary to the grave, second half of the 19th century, s.b.l.: “Daniel Editeur, 61 rue de Vaugirard, Paris, au St Couer de Marie,” s.b.r.: “Imp Lemercier, Paris,” 47×32 cm
  16. Saint Magdalena Sophia, late-19th century, s.b.l.: “Fotot. G.&M. Piazza Pigna 53 Roma,” 35×25 cm (3 items)
  17. Saint Magdalena Sophia, early-20th century, s.b.r.: “Fotot. G.&M. p. pigna 53 Roma” 34.5×25 cm, 38×28.5 cm, (2 items)
  18. Claudio de la Colombière, S.J., first half of the 20th century, s.b.l.: “Proprieta Riservata,” s.b.r.: “Tip. S. Lega Eucaristica Milano,” 45×31 cm
  19. Saint Anthony of Padova, late-19th century, n.s., 25×16.5
  20. Pope Leo XIII, turn of the 19th and 20th centuries, s.b.r.: “Hamböck,” s.b.: “Reproduction des von Sr Heiligkeit der Stadt München geschenkten Originalgemäldes.,” 31×22 cm
  21. Pope Pius X, early-20th century, n.s., 30×22.5
  22. Bishop Lajos Haynald, mid-19th century, n.s., 23×20 cm
  23. Bishop Mihály Fogarassy, second half of the 19th century, s.b.r.: “Pr. Grund V Budapest,” s.b.: “Publisher Vereby Soma,” 42×29 cm
  24. Emperor Francis I and Empress Maria Louise, early-19th century, n.s., 37×27 cm
  25. Maria Flower, early-20th century, n.s., 27×20.5 cm
  26. János Hunyadi at the Battle of Varna, second half of the 19th century, s.b.l.: “Carved in stone by József Marastoni after the original drawing of Henrik Weber,” s.b.r.: “Prntd Engell and Mandello in Pest,” 47.5×34 cm
  27. Portrait of Mihály Tompa, 1858, s.b.l.: “Barabás 857.,” s.b.r.: “J. Axmann & J. Benedict sc. 858.,” 28×20 cm
  28. Portrait of József Eötvös, 19th century, s.b.l.: “Drawing. Barabás,” s.b.r.: “Engr. Mahlknecht,” s.b.: “Women’s World, Published by Gusztáv Heckenast,” 27.8×18.5 cm
  29. Portrait of Ferenc Kölcsey, 1863, s.b.l.: “Painted Einsle. Drawn. Ender.,” s.b.r.: “Engr. Schwerdgeburth.,” s.b.: “Supplement to issue 49 of ‘Women’s World’,” 26.5×16.5 cm
  30. Portrait of József Bajza, 19th century, s.b.l.: “drawing Barabás.,” s.b.r.: “Engraved in steel by Mahlknecht” s.b.: “Women’s World, published by Gusztáv Heckenast,” 28×19
  31. Portrait of Gergely Czuczor, 19th century, s.b.l.: “Painted by Barabás 1837. Copied 1858.,” s.b.r.: “Engraved by József Axmann in Vienna,” s.b.: “Women’s World, published by Gusztáv Heckenast in Pest,” 28×20.5 cm
  32. Portrait of Mór Jókai, 19th century, s.b.l.: “Barabás. 858.,” s.b.r.: “Jos. Axmann sculps:,” s.b.: “Women’s World, Published by Gusztáv Heckenast in Pest,” 28×20.5 cm
  33. Portrait of János Arany, 19th century, s.b.l.: “Barabás del. 856.” s.b.r.: “Jos. Axmann sculps,” s.b.: “Women’s World, Published by Gusztáv Heckenast in Pest,” 28×16 cm
  34. Count István Széchenyi in 1860, second half of the 19th century, s.b.r.: “Barabás 860,” s.b.l.: “Prnt. Reiffenstein and Rösch,” s.b.: “Published by Ferdinánd Pfeiter,” 42×29 cm
  35. Portrait of Kristóf Lukácsy, late-19th century, n.s. 23.5×16 cm
  36. University Professor Ignác Sauer, second half of the 19th century, s.b.r.: “Barabás 859,” s.b.l.: “Prnt. Reiffenstein and Rösch in Vienna,” 42.5×27 cm
  37. The Finding of Moses, 19th century, s.b.l.: “Veronese pinxit,” s.b.r.: “W. French sc,” s.b.: “Druck u Verlag d Englischen Kunstanstalt v A. H. Payne Leipzig u Dresden,” 28×21 cm
  38. The Brass Serpent, 19th century, s.b.r.: “A. H. Payne sc.,” 26.5×20 cm
  39. View of Jerusalem, 19th century, s.b.l.: “Alexius Geyer,” s.b.r.: “A. H. Payne sc.,” s.b.: “Printed and Published for the Proprietors A.H. Payne Leipzig & Dresden.,” 28.5×21 cm
  40. Jacob’s Dream, 19th century, s.b.l.: “Ferd. Bol pinx.” s.b.r.: “A.H. Payne sc.,” s.b.: “Druck u Verlag d Englischen Kunstanstalt v A. H. Payne Leipzig u Dresden,” 28×21 cm
  41. Neapolitan hackney-cab, mid-19th century, s.b.l.: “Peingret,” s.b.r.: “W French sc,” s.b.: “Druck u Verlag d Englischen Kunstanstalt v A. H. Payne Leipzig u Dresden,” 28×22 cm
  42. Rubens’ masterwork, 19th century, n.s., 31.5×23.5 (21 items)
  43. Lake Czege seen from the palace balcony, late-19th century, s.b.r.: “Photoprint Divald K. Eperjes,” 28×20 cm
  44. The palace of Count Viktor Kornis in Mănăstirea (Szentbenedek), late-19th century, s.b.r.: “Photoprint Divald K. Eperjes,” 28×20 cm
  45. Solomon’s tower in Visegrád, 19th century, s.b.l.: “L. Rohboch delt.,” s.b.l.: “F. Hablitschek sculps.,” s.b.: “Druck & Verlag v. G. G. Lange in Darmstadt. / In Lauffer and Stolp’s consignment, Pest,” 25.5×16.5 cm
  46. The Vácz cemetery in Pest, 19th century, s.b.l.: “L. Rohbock delt.,” s.b.r.: “G.M. Kurz sculpt.” s.b.: “Druck & Verlag v. G. G. Lange in Darmstadt. / In Lauffer and Stolp’s consignment, Pest,” 25.5×16.5 cm
  47. Eger from the Northern side, 19th century, s.b.l.: “L. Rohbock delt.,” s.b.r.: “G. Hess sculps.,” s.b.: “Druck & Verlag v. G. G. Lange in Darmstadt / In Lauffer and Stolp’s consignment, Pest,” 25.5×16.5 cm
  48. The newly renovated church of mining town Smolník (Szomolnok), early-20th century, s.b.: “Print by Viktor Hornyánszky,” 24.5×16 cm
  49. View of Sněžka, mid-19th century, s.b.l.: “Würbs delin.,” s.b.r.: “Gh Daumerlang sculp.,” s.b.: “Sklad Synů Bohumila Haase,” 28×23 cm
  50. Saint James’ Church, Kutná Hora (Chram Sw Jakuba w Kutné Horé), 19th century, s.b.l.: “C. Würbs,” s.b.: “Sklad Synů Bohumila Haase,” 27.5×23 cm (2 items)
  51. View of Washington (Kapitol we Washingtoné), 19th century, s.b.: “Sklad Synů Bohumila Haase,” 27.5×23 cm
  52. Saint Barbara’s Church (Chram sw. Barbory), Kutná Hora, s.b.l.: “W. Kandler del.,” s.b.r.: “B.C. Shmidt sc.,” s.b.: “Sklad Synů Bohumila Haase,” 27.5×23 cm
  53. The Walls of Constantinople (Hraby Carihradské), 19th century, s.b.: “Sklad Synů Bohumila Haase,” 27.5×22.5 cm
  54. Charity (Dobrocinnost), 19th century, s.b.r.: “Baumann sc.,” s.b.: “Sklad Synů Bohumila Haase,” 17.5×23 cm
  55. View of the city of Wíden, 19th century, s.b.r.: “K. Schmidt del. et sc.,” s.b.: “Sklad Synů Bohumila Haase,” 28×23 cm
  56. Bulgarian genre picture (Bulharska Wes.), 19th century, s.b.: “Sklad Synů Bohumila Haase,” 27.5×23 cm
  57. Madrid, the chief city of the Spaniards (Madrid hlawní město we Španělích), 19th century, s.b.r.: “Leopold Burckhart sculp. Vienna,” s.b.: “Sklad Synů Bohumila Haase,” 27.5×23 cm (2 items)
  58. Shepherd-boy from Rome (Římský pastoušhek), 19th century, s.b.r.: “A. Wildner,” s.b.: “Sklad Synů Bohumila Haase,” 27.5×23 cm
  59. The Acropolis of Athens (Akropolis w Athenách), 19th century, s.b.l.: “R v Heideggen del,” s.b.r.: “C. Daumerlan fc 46,” s.b.: “Sklad Synů Bohumila Haase,” 27.5×23 cm

339/m. Signet collection

19th–20th century

1 boxes = 25 items

The signet collection of the ACCAA consists of 25 signets which used erstwhile to be applied to authorize the documents of church, educational, and various social institutions.

  1. Charitable Ladies’ Society of Armenopolis
  2. Apostolic Governorate of the Armenian-rite Catholics
  3. Inspected and reviewed by us
  4. Armenian Catholic parish office
  5. Armenian Catholic Public Schools of Armenopolis 1894
  6. Conversational Society of Armenopolis 1860
  7. Economic Bureau of the Armenian Catholic Ecclesia of Armenopolis
  8. Armenian Catholic Orphanage Institute of Armenopolis
  9. Procuratrix of the Girls’ Orphanage
  10. Roman Catholic Girls’ Orphanage – Róbert Kovrig
  11. Armenian Museum Union
  12. Armenian Catholic Church Choir
  13. Armenian Catholic Elementary School
  14. Armenian Catholic Boys’ Orphanage
  15. Armenian Roman Catholic Boys’ Orphanage of Saint Gregory
  16. Girls’ Orphanage
  17. Boys’ Orphanage of Saint Gregory the Illuminator
  18. Saint Gregory’s Fund 1851–1900 Cluj
  19. Book
  20. Paid
  21. Paid
  22. Print
  23. Canceled
  24. Dedicated
  25. Unknown

339/n. Map collection

19th–20th century

1 box = 0.12 lma

1. box. Mixed maps 19th–20th century.

339/o. Collection of plans and designs

19th–20th century

1 folder = 0.12 lma

The collection of plans and designs consists of the complete or partial architectural drawings of the buildings possessed and/or maintained by the Armenian Catholic Parish of Armenopolis.[26]

  1. Plans for the Armenian Catholic Girls’ Orphanage of Armenopolis: frontal design and cross-section – 1901
  2. Plans for the Armenian Catholic Girls’ Orphanage in Armenopolis: ground-plan, cross-section, facade – 1901
  3. Plans for the Armenian Catholic Girls’ Orphanage in Armenopolis: inter-earth cellar fundament – 1901
  4. Plans for the Armenian Catholic Girls’ Orphanage in Armenopolis: cross-section – 1901
  5. Plans for the Armenian Catholic Girls’ Orphanage in Armenopolis: section with side-section – 1901
  6. Plans for the Armenian Catholic Girls’ Orphanage in Armenopolis: plans for two wood-sheds – 1901
  7. Plans for the Armenian Catholic Girls’ Orphanage in Armenopolis: ground-floor plan – 1901
  8. Plans for the Armenian Catholic Girls’ Orphanage in Armenopolis: cellar ground-plan – 1901
  9. Plans for the expansion and reconstruction of the former refectory building in the possession of the Armenian Catholic Girls’ Orphanage – 1902
  10. Frontal design for the Armenian Catholic Boys’ Orphanage, signed by Lorenzo Zotti – c. 1893
  11. Ground-plan of the Armenian Catholic Boys’ Orphanage , signed by Lorenzo Zotti – c. 1893
  12. Plans for the Armenian Catholic Boys’ Orphanage: ground-plan, facade, cross-section – late-19th century
  13. Design for the main altar of Trinity Church – first half of the 19th century
  14. Drawing of the main gate to the parsonage – second half of the 19th century
  15. Design for the tomb monument to be erected in Lukácsy’s chapel
  16. Design for city planning (unknown square) – second half of the 19th century
  17. Plans for the stables at Reteag (Retteg): ground-plan, cross-section, frontal design – 1863
  18. Ground-plan of the Armenian Catholic Cathedral (crypts) – second half of the 20th century

339/p. Heraldic collection

19th–20th century

1 folder = 0.12 lma

This is a unique collection among the archives of the archdiocese, incorporating family and funereal heraldic designs. These depictions, enchanting in their sheer visual appearance, belong to individuals introduced individually below.

  1. László Karátsonyi of Beodra, Sr. – 19th century[27]
  2. Izay family, aka Huszthy – 19th century
  3. Coat-of-arms of the Simai (Simay) family – 1843[28]
  4. Coat-of-arms of the Markovits family – 1843[29]
  5. Coat-of-arms of Ferenc Karátsonyi of Beodra – 1881
  6. Coat-of-arms of Géza Lompérdi Korbuly[30] – 1890[31]
  7. Coat-of-arms of Gergely Simay – 1909 (2 items)
  8. Coat-of-arms of Count Ármin Wass of Ţaga (Czege) and Sântejude (Szentegyed) – 1914
  9. Coat-of-arms of Bogdán Lompérdi Korbuly[32] – 1911


[1] Gazdovits, Miklós: Az erdélyi örmény város: Szamosújvár történetéből. In: Helmut Buschhausen–Livia Drăgoi–Nicolae Gazdovits, ed.: Örmény kultúra és művészet Szamosújváron. Bukarest, 2002. 18.

[2] Szongott, Kristóf: A szamosújvári örm. kath. nagytemplom története. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1893. 201–201.

[3] Szongott, Kristóf: Szamosújvár szab. kir. város monográfiája. III. Szamosújvár, 1901. 54.

[4] The girls’ orphanage was founded by Tivadar Kovrig in 1893, in order to grant schooling to orphaned or semi-orphaned Armenian girls in Transylvania.

[5] Nagyné Lukács, Klára: A szamosújvári örmény katolikus árvaházak története. In: Őze, Sándor–Kovács, Bálint ed.: Örmény diaszpóra a Kárpát-medencében II. Piliscsaba, 2007. 170–171.

[6] Ibid. 172.

[7] Szongott, Kristóf: Szamosújvár szab. kir. város monográfiája. II. Szamosújvár, 1901. 204.

[8] The Hungarian-language abstract of the constitution of the Tanners’ Society is given in Szongott, Kristóf: Szamosújvár szabad királyi város monográfiája. III. Szamosújvár, 1901. 34–36.

[9] Rónai Aross Lajos: Szongott, Kristóf. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1901. 146–148; Gabányi, János: Szongott Kristóf születésnek 100 éves évfordulója. In: Szamosújvári M. Kir. Állami Gimnázium 1942/43 évkönyve. Szamosújvár, 1943. 1–7.

[10] Szongott, Kristóf: dr. Mály István. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1893. 225–234.

[11] Ferenczi, Sándor: A gyulafehérvári (erdélyi) főegyházmegye történeti papi névtára. Budapest–Kolozsvár, 2009. 173.

[12] Szongott, Kristóf: op. cit. I. Szamosújvár, 1901. 393–403.; Jakubinyi, György: op. cit. 2001. 43–44.; Gazdovits, Miklós: op. cit. 2006. 308–311.

[13] Kristóf Lukácsy’s manor at Copftelek manifested part of the capital of the boys’ orphanage.

[14] Ferenczi, Sándor: op. cit. 251.

[15] Magyar Katolikus Lexikon. II. Budapest, 1993. 313; Szongott, Kristóf: Czetz Gergely. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1894. 44–46.

[16] Ferenczi, Sándor: op. cit. 713.

[17] Mály, István dr.: Merza, Gyula irodalmi tevékenysége. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1905. 353–356.; Romániai magyar irodalmi lexikon: Szépirodalom, közírás, tudományos irodalom, művelődés III. (Kh–M). (gen.ed. Dávid, Gyula.) Bukarest, 1994. 547.

[18] Ferenczi Sándor: op. cit. 280.

[19] Szongott, Kristóf: op. cit. I. Szamosújvár, 1901. 373–376.

[20] Jakubinyi, György: op. cit. 2001, 39.

[21] Szongott, Kristóf: op. cit. III. Szamosújvár, 1901. 181–184.; Ferenczi, Sándor: op. cit. 289.

[22] Szongott, Kristóf: dr. Molnár Antal. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1898. 66–68.

[23] Szongott, Kristóf: Mártonffy Márton. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1903. 33–41.

[24] Jakubinyi, György: op. cit. 2001. 35.

[25] The itemized catalogue of the engravings has been compiled by art historian Dr. Emese Pál; we are most grateful for her helpfulness and accurate working methods. Abbreviations: n.s. – no sign; s.b.r. – signed bottom right; s.b.l. – signed bottom left; s.b. – signed at the bottom.

[26] The registry of the plans and designs was compiled by art historian Dr. Emese Pál, whose enthusiasm and helpfulness were instrumental in the creation of this corpus.

[27] For more information on the origin and herald of the family, cf. Temesváry, János: A gróf Karácsonyi család őse és genealogusaink. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1892. 42–47; Temesváry, János: A gróf Karátsonyi család ősi nemessége és czímerbővítései. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1892. 72–77.

[28] The Simay family was ennobled by Empress Maria Theresa in 1760. The heraldic deed of the same date was reproduced in Temesváry, János: Simay család. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1895. 266–273.

[29] The coat-of-arms was bestowed upon the Markovics family in 1839. The heraldic deed was reproduced in Temesváry, János: Márkovics család (kis-terpesti). In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1895. 256–261.

[30] Géza Lompérdi Korbuly was the son of Bogdán Korbuly. Cf. Szongott, Kristóf: A Korbuly család. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1907. 27.

[31] The coat-of-arms was bestowed upon the Korbuly family in 1879. The heraldic deed was reproduced in Temesváry, János: Korbuly család (lompérdi). In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1895. 56–59.

[32] Bogdán Lompérdi Korbuly was the intendant of the National Theatre of Cluj. For further biographical details, see Merza, Gyula: Lompérdi Korbuly Bogdán. In: Armenia. Magyar-örmény havi szemle. 1906. 177–180.


 

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